Newton News Editor, Paul Howarth, obtains a Read-For-Free-Deal for his readers!

Starting today, ending midnight 30th September, spread the word among family, friends and colleagues and read this exciting thriller novel, free of charge on mobile, tablet and PC devices.

Go to, www.ardengrant.com – click on Promotion in the menu bar and enter password: newtonian (case sensitive).

LET THE SECRETS UNFOLD

With roots planted firmly in Newton Aycliffe, Paul Howarth, editor of the Newton News, catches up with Arden Grant, a high school friend and author of, ‘The Fuzidon, Will you die to live again?’ Clinching a FREE read deal for his avid readers in a candid conversation, Paul asks about Arden’s life journey and finds out where the inspiration came from to write his epic thriller – one that interlinks three worlds.

The Interview

Paul: “I bump into some of your siblings at times when they come into the shop. How many brothers and sisters do you have?”

Arden: “Four and four. I’m the second youngest of nine, making it five brothers.

Paul: “When you finished school at the Avenue Comprehensive, what did you do? As I remember you had a passion for cars.”

Arden: “I suppose most teenagers did back then, until you pulled up in a van splashed with Night Owl Roadshow across it. I never figured you for a DJ?” (Paul laughed).

Paul: “I believe that was around the same time you opened your first business on Aycliffe Industrial Estate?”

Arden: “Yes, kit cars. I was a young, budding entrepreneur. It was short lived, though I did manage to make the front cover of some car magazine after exhibiting at the Great Aycliffe Show.”

Paul: “What made you decide to leave your home town?”

Arden: “That’s a loaded question.”

Paul: “Would you care to elaborate?”

Arden: “Back then I was going through a lot of soul searching. But I recall one specific night when I was at an all-time low. The air was brisk. The sky was clear. Filled with frustrations, I walked to the garden gate and looked to the stars. I began muttering my inner thoughts aloud, questioning my purpose, like one does in difficult times. All of a sudden, a rush of adrenalin coursed through my veins. My heart raced, it was hard to breath. My hands started to shake. It was only moments, but it scared me. I felt my life was about to come to an abrupt end.”

Paul: “Did this ever happen again?”

Arden: “Once in 2006. Maybe we’ll come back to that later.”

Paul: “Then let’s talk about the time between then and now. Tell me a bit about your life, where you were, what career path you took before you decided to write.

Arden: “I don’t think we’ve got a year to spare. But I’ll paint you the picture in broad strokes. Over the course of two decades I went in search of my destiny. I travelled a fair portion of the world starting in Europe. I connected to a few business owners. Being entrepreneurial I negotiated a deal paid on results. I felt I could do a better job than what others had been doing for them. It was a long shot but I was motivated. With no risk to them, it worked out and new doors of opportunity opened. After that, I travelled globally, both as a trainer, trouble shooter and sales director for companies in hospitality and real estate sectors.”

Paul: “Did you miss your home town?”

Arden: “I did, but when you’re living in the moment, it’s rare to get time for yourself, and even harder to revisit family back home.”

Paul: “Any regrets?”

Arden: “Sure, many. To others, it might seem a glorious way to live, in reality, it was a pressure cooker. Like New Yorkers said to me, five years in the Big Apple is like one in Europe.”

Paul: “So when did you realise your years went by so quickly?”

Arden: “The day I saw you again.” Arden laughed.

Paul: “Very funny. I see you never lost your sense of humour. So when exactly did you decide to change your career direction?”

Arden: “That was about five years ago, that’s when I decided to write more seriously. But three years ago, writing became my primary focus.”

Paul: “Your novel is somewhat of an epic, my wife’s read it and her words after finishing it were, I want more! Where did the inspiration behind such a tale come from?”

Arden: “Well, the truth is quite unbelievable.”

Paul: “I’m sure we would all like to know.”

Arden: “Do you remember the opening scene in chapter two of my book?”

Paul: “I do.”

Arden: “Putting the fiction aside, that morning when cold winds blew, drizzle fell, and dark clouds met with crashing waves, in reality that was me in 2006, jogging barefoot along the beach. Just like the time I mentioned walking to the garden gate, a short time before I left Aycliffe, I spoke out once more in frustration. Actually, I screamed.”

Paul: “And is this when you felt that same sensation for the second time?”

Arden: “Yes, but on this occasion as adrenalin flowed, a story so vivid and overwhelming gushed into mind, swamping all other thoughts I had. Stupefied, I froze for a few moments. Afraid I’d lose the narrative thrown my way, I ran to a small beach shack and scribbled on more than fifty paper napkins.”

Paul: “And that’s how the story came to you?”

Arden: “The skeleton outline, yes. The storyline was a gift, yet a gift that taunted me to write and rewrite time and time again, until it all made sense and I typed the words, The End. Bizarre, isn’t it, how the universe challenges you before it gives back?”

Paul: “Which means?”

Arden: “This is what I asked for Paul, back at the garden gate, all those years ago. It seems I had to have first lived life’s course, to become worthy to have been handed this particular tale!”

Paul: “Then it’s been a long journey.”

Arden: “That it has, and yet the end is just beginning.”

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Who is the Newtonian author going under the pseudonym Arden Grant?

Email your guess to paul@newtonnews.co.uk

If you’re right, the author will personally reply.